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Made In Occupied Japan Woman Figurine Collectible

 

price: 
$24.00,  firm
 
location: 
Aurora, Illinois, USA
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shipping: 
$5.95, buyer pays
 
seller: 
Silvertech ( 3 )

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condition:
used
 
ad id#: 
3049075
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  Description:
This rare porcelain figurine was made in Japan right after WWII. It is hand painted and was made sometime during the period of 1944-1952 and is guaranteed to be somewhere between 57 and 65 years old. She stands about 7" tall and is 3" wide. A photo of the actual figurine and the maker's mark also is included below. Shipped the next day carefully packed and fully insured.

$24.00




Read this source article about Made In Occupied Japan collectibles:

"Collecting Wares Made in Post-WWII ‘Occupied Japan’ by WorthPoint Staff (07/07/09).

"...The color is not significant and has no bearing on the value of the item. The unevenness of the letters is typical and appears in nearly all OJ marks.

Which is why collecting items made in Occupied Japan is such an interesting and contained hobby. The limits are set because the time frame for the manufactured goods was fixed. Furthermore, the identification of the goods was very rigidly controlled, leaving no doubt as to the authenticity of the collectibles. And, just to make the hobby that much more attractive, at the moment most of the items are modestly priced.

But to start, let’s look at the historical facts. Following the Second World War, the United States occupied Japan, and because much of the manufacturing sector had been destroyed by bombing during the last years of the war, the first major objective was to restore Japan’s economy by rebuilding its industry and reestablishing the export trade. To help accomplish this task, the U.S. set up an agency to encourage and control the exporting of goods from Japan to the United States.

Between 1945 and 1947, the exports consisted mainly of raw materials, but in 1947 manufactured goods began to reappear. Consequently, the agency issued a directive to Japan stipulating that all goods prepared for export must carry the stamp or label “Made in Occupied Japan.” A second directive in 1949 stated that the goods could to be marked “Made in Occupied Japan,” “Made in Japan” or “Occupied Japan” and “Japan” where space was limited. This latter directive gives collectors something of a dilemma because it clearly shows that many items marked “Japan” or “Made in Japan” were imported into the U.S. during the occupation period. However, as the hobby now stands, only those items marked “Made in Occupied Japan” (MIOJ) or “Occupied Japan” (OJ) are considered collectible. One exception to this rule is a boxed item that shows the mark on the box but not on the item; but of course the item and box must always be kept together.

On April 25, 1952 the occupation of Japan was officially ended after eight years (1945 to 1952). During this limited time, huge numbers of exported items were produced eventually becoming the basis of a hobby commonly referred to as collecting OJ’s. When they think of Occupied Japan, most collectors think of porcelain figurines. However, while it’s true that the figurines form the basis of most collections, almost every other imaginable item was produced, including everyday objects such as clocks, toys, cameras, jewelry, lamps, lighters and kitchenware. As noted, they all had to have the MIOJ or OJ identification. In some cases it was a label, sometimes an embossed name, but most commonly a black or red printed ink stamp. The color of the ink seems to have been arbitrary and has no bearing on the value of the piece. A maker’s name or logo often accompanied the printed ink stamp, which makes for a most interesting sideline to OJ collecting. One author shows 213 different OJ marks, and I’m sure that there are many more to be found..."
Source: http://www.worthpoint.com/article/collecting-wares-occupied-japan


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We accept Credit or Debit cards, Bitcoin, Dwolla, and PayPal (thru CCNOW). Most orders shipped in 1-3 business days however your order may be delayed during peak holiday or busy shipping seasons.

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